Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Entomological Neurology, Inc.




Dr. Grumpy: "Any seizures since your last visit?"

Mrs. Thorax: "No, that issue is fine. But my big toe is killing me. A spider bit it this morning."

Dr. Grumpy: "What kind?"

Mrs. Thorax: "I don't know. What do you think?" (whips out tupperware with big ugly spider crawling around in it).

29 comments:

Anonymous said...

Don't open IT!!!

CrownedwithVictory said...

At least it wasn't a Ziplock baggie.

Anonymous said...

What the Hell is with patients bringing in Tupperware/Rubbermaid containers and Ziploc bags of crap for you to look at? Are you a forensic pathologist as well???? Have they been watching too much CSI?

Grumpy, M.D. said...

Maybe they think I'm hungry?

Mr. Gaunt said...

Patients very often feel the urgent need to show things you definitely do not want to see. That's an absolutely normal occurence at your doctor or your pharmacy.
Well, o.k., maybe not normal. But common.

KYLady said...

Maybe you should have picked up the phone and called PETA. Poor spider!

Aleigh said...

CSI indeed... looks like he needs Dr. Grissom (who has a PhD in forensic entomology) more than he needs Dr. Grumpy.

jimbo26 said...

Sorry - ROFLMAO .

Anonymous said...

"After all these years of hearing people talk about it, I decided I'd finally try surfing a web, but I just don't get the appeal."

Watercolor said...

LOL. Well, last time I got bit by something weird, they did tell me to bring it in, so.... But it was dead. And I was going to the appropriate doctor. haha

terri c said...

AAAAACKKK!!!! I figured she'd want to show you the TOE!!! Did you send her directly to ERP's emergency department?

Anonymous said...

I love how I got a Terminex ad.

Anonymous said...

good thing you're not an arachnophobic.

I'm starting to think that bringing baggies in with stuff is not all uncommon? I shadowed a family care doc once, and a patient brought in a baggie with a bunch of her hair that had fallen out. I got the sense she didn't think the doc would believe her, or realize how serious the hair loss was (to her) unless he had proof. Unfortunately I think it only annoyed him and he kinda dismissed it and her.

lbparker said...

Hmmm, tarantula tortellini. Sounds good!

Old MD Girl said...

Ack!!! I probably would have screamed if that had happened to me.

Lois said...

This is very enlightening for me! Can you tell me, which type of medical specialist could identify a snake for me?

Anonymous said...

At couple of years ago, I had injured my foot and my primary doc was looking at it. Across the exam room was an ugly looking spider (of course, in my mind--ALL spiders are ugly). I screamed. She thought she had really touched on a tender spot. I pointed out the spider and she screamed. A few moments later, one of the other doctors in the clinic knocked on the door to make sure everything was OK. We made him come in and squish the spider. To this day, we don't live that down. So don't worry, I won't bring one with me to my next visit!!

Mimir said...

Oh dear! It's kind of impressive that the patient managed to catch the spider in the first place though.

Anonymous said...

why did you ask "what kind"? if you didn't ask then maybe she wouldn't show you the spider.

Sassy said...

Lois - I would say ED doctors. We have a Wilderness Medicine interested group at my medical school, and last semester an ER doc invited a herpetologist who brought in live snakes to show students how to identify them. Alright when the snakes stay in their cages, less alright when the big ass diamondback rattlesnake comes off the table and slithers across the floor toward the students...

Anonymous said...

@Lois @Sassy got it right. ED/urgent care get to see all the crazy. LOVE it when they bring the live copperhead in something flimsy like a coffee container with a plastic top that keeps moving as the snake is striking it. That gets sent right out to the dumpster away from my building.

Of course I've also seen the other extreme of "can you identify this snake that I chopped into 10 billion pieces"...um, no, sorry, not here to do jigsaw puzzles.

heidi said...

I've been designated the bug remover at work. I do NOT remove bees/wasps (or lizards) though!

bogart said...

Yeah, I've had people tell me if I get bitten by a tick that I should hang onto it ... you know, in case I get sick. And really? First, I'd have a pretty elaborate tick collection sometimes. And second, really? What am I going to do with the tick(s) -- bring them in to the doctor when I have symptoms that might be Rocky mtn. spotted fever (or Lyme's) and say, "Here's the suspect!" That recommendation has always mystified me (and no, I don't follow it).

Anonymous said...

OK, that IS kinda weird, but honestly, what if it had been some exotic freaky thing with a lethal toxin, and the only way to treat her was to know what kind of spider it was? I rather admire her dedication, and might have done the same thing myself in similar circumstances, if only from watching too many episodes of House.

Packer said...

Don't worry about it if it is not a TICK, it probably won't kill you, even a snake bite from an American snake probably won't kill you. Neuros should know more about ticks than they do, cause Lyme and the other stuff they transmit have a lot of neuro symptoms. BTW, all spiders are venomous--it is just a matter of how potent. They don't bother me except when the come off the ceiling while you sleep and land on your face. Most people don't realize that happens all the time, have a good nights sleep tonight.

Kicking Back On Sundays said...

AHAHHA I love it. At least the patient was prepared? In Guatemala the hotel owner caught a black widow, put it in a water bottle and showed to it everyone. 5 people almost passed out.

June Clever said...

I was at the vet once, with one of my dogs, and had something simialr happen. A man was there with a small snake, maybe 8 inches long, in a tupperware/gladware bowl thing. He wanted to know what kind of snake it was. Receptionist dind't know. Tech didn't know. Vet didn't know. I asked fi I could see it...he had a baby copperhead.

Narad said...

BTW, all spiders are venomous--it is just a matter of how potent.

Tell that to the hackled orb weaver. [/pedantry]

Anonymous said...

Actually, speaking as a toxicologist, catching and keeping the spider is exactly the right thing to do.

 
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