Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Is it covered by Medicare?

Seen in a hospital chart:




For my non-medical readers:

QD: Once a day
BID: Twice a day
TID: Three times a day
PRN: As needed

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hey, alcohol's a drug, good on the patient to include it. Forgot the dosage strength though. To effect perhaps?

Anonymous said...

There's a big difference between "Scotch QHS PRN" and "Scotch BID PRN"

Moose said...

Metformin AND scotch?

OW, MY LIVER!

Anonymous said...

It's covered, but only the generic kind that comes in plastic bottles. Macallan, Springbank and Lagavulin require special authorization.

Anonymous said...

Aren't there copay cards out there to bring my Macallan co-pay down to $10?

Anonymous said...

That's not an uncommon order for a hospital patient who is alcoholic or regularly partakes here. Better than having them go into withdrawal during their stay, don't you think?

Mrs. Widget said...

Is it possible the scotch is for the doctor?

MDaisy said...

I'll drink to that!

Scrub Ninja said...

But you can't write QD anymore. The pharmacy police are gonna show up and confiscate your fingers.

For nonmedical folks: QD is one of many "forbidden abbreviations" because it is too similar to QID, which means four times a day.

rapnzl rn said...

Guessing my Ardberg isn't in the formulary, either. Shuckydarn.

clairesmum said...

I'm old enough to remember when pharmacies in Massachusetts sold liquor (pints, mostly) for medicinal purposes. It was the only place to buy liquor on a Sunday until the Blue Laws were amended in this century.
I've seen orders for wine or port written for residents in a nursing home. Had to change to having the family bring it in each time instead of keeping a bottle in the med room, when one of the nurses started to tipple!

 
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