Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Comparing apples to apples

Like most docs, I use Epocrates on a PDA for medication info. It's not perfect, but very helpful.

So today I had to look up something on Topamax and found this, under "Look/Sound alike drug names"

"Topamax may be confused with Topiramate"

They're the SAME FREAKING DRUG, for crap's sake!!!

(For those of you looking this up on your PDA, it's under "Safety/Monitoring")

18 comments:

Kat's Kats said...

ROFLOLASTC*!! As someone who takes the generic of Topomax I find this especially hysterical!

*Rolling On Floor Laughing Out Loud And Scaring The Cats

plescart - a cart full of diet coke

Old MD Girl said...

Awesome.

Eileen said...

So that's Ok then...

NY pharmacy intern said...

About the only reason I can think for that to come up is some physicians can get real pissy if they say topamax and generic gets dispensed because they neglected to tell the pharmacist that it is brand name they want dispensed.

I've also seen one local prescriber write for generic and then put DAW (dispense as written) and expect brand dispensed. But I've also had others write DAW on the generic name for something that has no generic but expects the pharmacy to seemingly pull a generic out our rears because he/she says there is a generic.

The Nerdy Nurse said...

That's pretty amusing. What a nice Easter egg to find in your medication software.
Hiw nice of them to have a sense of humor.

Moose said...

I wonder if it'd tell you that oxycodone sounds like oxycontin

Sandra said...

I bet that entry was a well disguised advertisement by the manufacturer of Topamax to try and keep doctors from prescribing the generic. HAHAHA

Amanda said...

On a semi-related note, the site I use for tracking my calories offers helpful hints when we're looking up food, in case we've misspelled it or something.

Unfortunately, when I put in "Nonfat Milk" it asks me "Did you mean Nonfatal Milk?"

Erm... yes, but I wasn't aware I needed to specify.

*headdesk*

The Mendon Foodie said...

I recently had a resident not even know that topirimate was the generic for Topamax. I found it disconcerting, until I decided to give him a pass because he was an allergist. At least his attending knew what it was.

rxBambi said...

I'm not sure about the doctors version, but I can tell you that most pharmacists I know think Lexi-comp is far superior to Epocrates... just sayin...

and ps- Lexi-comp doesn't give the topamax/topiramate safety issue :)

PAS said...

Epocrates does get credit for having almost every insurance formulary in it. Now if only there was a way to tell which one a particular patient is on...

@Moose That'd actually be a pretty good one. I can't count the number of doctors who've called up furious that we won't cover Oxycontin 5mg.

For nonpharmacy folks, the smallest dose of Oxycontin(which is a 12 hr controlled release) is 10 mg. The 5 mg is not controlled release and is not called Oxycontin. Or as retail customers like to call it: 'oxycottons'.

Anonymous said...

We do have Oxycontin 5 mg here in Canada, but it's not as popular as the other strengths ;)

Shauna (murgatr)

Pharm.Tech RDC'06

Greg said...

Now that's funny. I too use Epocrates a good bit and like it, but it's certainly not exhaustive. Now I know that it can also provide comic relief!

Lord of the Eeple said...

Hmm. My psychiatrist does not appear to know the names of the drugs she prescribes and became mildly confused when I spoke of 'citalopram' instead of calling it, as she wrote in the Rx, 'Celexa, generic ok.'

Anonymous said...

I find it highly entertaining when I have to go through my meds list at the doctor's office. (I keep a little card in my wallet with drugs, dosages, doctors, allergies, and ICE contacts.) It seems that EMRs list most drugs as brands. There are only a few brand drugs I take, and I have to translate generic to brand for the RN/NP/PA/MA. Sheesh.

WV: repsysol - when you have to go back to the shrink because the last thing she tried didn't work

Anonymous said...

To be fair, it looks like Epocrates cites usp.org for their look-alike/sound-alike content. If USP lists Topamax and topiramate as look-alike/sound-alike, you can't just omit it and then give a citation. That would be misrepresenting the source material. But, yeah, funny!

terri c said...

Lovely. The computer is doing EXACTLY what it was told...

Kyla said...

Nice catch. LOL.

 
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