Friday, January 19, 2018

Seen in a chart


7 comments:

Stacey Gordon said...

That's just sick sick sick. And Tired.

Anonymous said...

Obviously the work of the department of redundancy department.

Mountain Woman said...

So, this person is in the hospital for hospitalization. At least we cleared that up.

Anonymous said...

The hospital billing department has a lot of difficulty because every patient is named "Name" and has their insurance through "Insurance Company."

clairesmum said...

so the security department activated the 'invisible ink' feature for records for this patient - he must be somebody really important!! ask the unit clerk for the secret decoder pen and run it over the screen..then you can find out what's really going on!



Anonymous said...

The 'invisible ink' feature is a big money-maker for the HIPAA-approved shady screen company. You see them in socially-conscious upscale public libraries where adult computers access is located in the children's section.

(Not like public libraries in my youth conveniently located near bus stations. These grand old buildings--think Zachariah Joshua Loussac Public Library -the ZJ for short, with marble steps and columns, outfitted with real oak chairs and rows of tables for viewing newspapers ... if in town, one might pay a visit to the Public Library, say, during an hour lay-over for the 6:45 AM transfer to or from the community college in the big city an hour drive from my distant hamlet. Sometimes, one might borrow a newspaper and position it strategically for a quick and refreshing nap. If too many snorers, I'd head over to the children's section and prop up a copy of some abridged version of edition of Encyclopedia Americana.)

I was thinking about this, and realize that at the time, the public library was one of the few places where smoking was not allowed. Another sign of the times, these places were not rife with wealth, but they managed to keep a public library open from 5:30 AM to 8:00 PM. On the other hand, encyclopedias were big, big books, not an Android device.

Kerlyssa said...

the first step is admitting the patient has a problem

 
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