Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Technology

Dr. Grumpy: "How are you doing? I heard you were in the hospital?"

Mr. Bag: "Yeah, I had a bad infection down there. They had to filet my scrotum to clean it out."

Dr. Grumpy: "That sounds awful."

Mr. Bag: (whips out phone) "Here's a picture."

23 comments:

Tracy said...

there's always a picture... but did he take it himself?

Ketsuban said...

Was the picture of just his scrotum as it normally is, the infection, or the fileted scrotum?

Grumpy, M.D. said...

Infected, fileted, and lots of pus.

I assume he had someone take it while he was under anesthesia. Because if he'd been awake I don't think he'd be in a condition to take a picture.

But you never know these days.

Dr Erhumu said...

Better a picture than a live sample, patients ability to preserve body fluids is uncanny. I was recently shown a well preserved syringe filled with pus.

Anonymous said...

That's it for breakfast.

Anonymous said...

Please... No links to pictures regarding this subject...

webhill said...

I hope he has some kind of neuropathological excuse for going around showing people pictures of his scrotum.

Old MD Girl said...

Fournier's?

Thatgirl said...

I prefer people who bring pictures to the ones who collect their bodily fluids in containers and bring it in (jar of sputum, things passed vaginally, etc).

Chris said...

Who in the HELL wants pictures of some infected body part? Who says to themselves, hey, this is SO gross, I HAVE to have a picture of this! WTF............

Packer said...

Most normal people would just keep on going, but no.....I had to open the comments.I am with Anon at 6:58

Anonymous said...

i thought you were a neurologist and knew nothing about down there?

compoundingRPH said...

What, no comment on the pseudonym for this patient?

Anonymous said...

Sorry for my ignorance, but is it really 'file' as in 'filet a fish'

DixieLaurel said...

OMG, whatever you do.....DO NOT google "Fournier's" and look at the images.

Mockingbird said...

I'm going there right now! Fournier's it is, right?

Anonymous said...

Hmmm...pizza.

McDuckVet said...

At least you work on people for a living. I had a woman a couple weeks ago drop trou in front of me to show me the rash on her upper thigh. We weren't even in an exam room - right in front of the receptionist's desk (who said the look on my face was priceless!). And no, it had nothing to do with why she brought in her dog. There's a reason I'm a vet. People are GROSS!!!

Anonymous said...

Filet? I know, I know, we need to use non-technical terminology, but would fileting describe the procedure? I just cannot picture a salmon filet and compare it to that particular body part.

Anonymous said...

Why is that what has "been seen"...cannot be "unseen"

NurseyNurse said...

When I was in nursing school I was bandaging a man's upper leg - he was a doctor and so was his wife. He had a massive surgical wound that I think had to be reopened after it was healing, and it was SO incredibly deep. I remember after the unwrapping, before rebandaging, he basically held his leg in a way that the wound was cracked open - and his wife must have snapped 20 pictures of the gaping, horrifying wound. It must have been fascinating to them. Watching them was fascinating to me!

RehabNurse said...

Grumpy:

I dress wounds like that every day when I work with patients. And yes, I have had them ask me to photograph them, which I always decline. We do have mirrors they can use, so some look.

If they want to, and can, I let them do their own. It gets old hearing, "Lemme see my butt(or other body part etc!)"

I don't mind most of them but the traumatic amputation I had to see once (patient was septic and had a guillotine procedure before plastics was able to fix it up) was the most troubling. The stump looked just like a ham hanging on the hook in one of those old movies.

I calmed myself, because the patient was exceptionally nice and I did not want he/she to feel self-conscious.

Anonymous said...

Yuck. But not as bad as some traffice accidents I've covered.

 
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